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How to find a husband after 35 book

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It is difficult to say what exactly is "simple" in this step-by-step plan for finding a "wonderful man" in 12 to 18 months. It certainly is not the part where Greenwald instructs the participant to call every person she knows—from her doctor to her ex-boyfriend—and make known her commitment to finding a mate. However, this Harvard graduate maintains that her program works for most of her clients as long as all the steps are implemented faithfully. Although it can be time-consuming, financially taxing and sometimes nearly humiliating, this approach will achieve the desired results, the author says. Drawing upon her marketing expertise as well as her experience with clients, Greenwald teaches the reader to always put her best foot forward, be willing to compromise on her ideals in a man and take rejection in stride. The book takes a reactionary, conservative approach to dating: she emphasizes the importance of femininity and of letting the man make the first move; "men are usually more attracted to women in skirts than in pants

Content:

Find a Husband After 35 Using What I Learned at Harvard Business School

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Issue of Posted Objective measures of eligibility—appearance, earning power, age—are understood to determine whether individuals will be perceived as desirable commodities the six-foot-two investment banker; the communications director with a good decade of childbearing years still ahead of her or relegated to the remainder bin, shopworn by blind dates and disappointments.

Class of , writes. Greenwald urges women to embrace the business practices they know from the workplace and apply them to private life. She should convene focus groups among friends, former boyfriends, and workmates to learn whether she should grow her hair longer or wear red instead of beige.

She should reinforce this brand message through the proven techniques of consumer marketing, including online marketing via Internet dating sites Greenwald warns against using a slutty-sounding screen name or betraying a taste for Virginia Woolf or Danielle Steel, to which no man is expected to warm and direct mail.

Do you know any single men you could introduce me to? This remedy has been proposed by so many advice columnists over the years that to attend an evening class in order to learn about the advertised subject would surely be as misguided as stepping into a massage parlor and expecting to get a massage. On Wednesday nights, Greenwald advises, a woman should haunt pizza parlors, where she might find a divorced dad with his kids on their midweek visitation.

One client took a year off from work to focus on finding a husband; another was nearly fired because of all the time she was devoting to the project. Humiliation will also be required, particularly when it comes to Step 10, Telemarketing. No alumnus, Realtor, veterinarian, florist, travel agent, group-therapy colleague, or old boyfriend must go uninterrogated. This is about as close as Greenwald gets to the kind of empathetic tone that used to characterize self-help books for women disappointed in love.

In the nineteen-seventies and eighties, such books were typically written by therapists. The eclipse of the therapeutic model of human relations and its replacement with a model drawn from business-management theory is a signature cultural shift of the moment, like the emergence of the half-caf vanilla latte. Another would-be wife, Kate, forty, quits her job in Manhattan and moves to what she thinks might be the less spousally competitive city of Minneapolis, where she has neither a job nor a home.

A woman is walking along the beach and sees a dapper man sitting on a bench. Smiling, she walks over and says, "You look like my third husband. Intrigued, the man responds, "How many husbands have you had? That's the joke. But the reality is that finding a husband is serious business, and no one takes that more to heart than Rachel Greenwald. Not really. But systematic, insightful, and proactive? Her stated objective for the reader is straightforward enough: To find a wonderful man to marry within 18 months.

To accomplish that, she sets out 15 steps. As Greenwald describes it: "You, the reader, are the 'product,' and the Program is a 'strategic plan' to help you 'market' yourself to find your future husband.

According to Greenwald, the book can be used by women of any age, but she explains that the over group is a more concentrated "niche market. A tall order, but according to Greenwald, many women have done just that, using her program.

Chapter by chapter, Greenwald develops each step in full, explaining it, giving guidelines, action plans, and case histories of her private clients or women from her nationwide US seminars. At the end of each chapter, there is a checklist.

Here, Greenwald itemizes what you should have accomplished in order to proceed to the next step. Thorough, sympathetic, and seemingly very sincere, Greenwald covers all her bases, presenting a comprehensive approach to finding the man of your dreams.

One of the factors she emphasizes is that what women think they want may not necessarily be what they should be looking for. So in Step 4, Market Expansion, she urges women to include men beyond their "perfect" list. She says she has seen time and again how women have found wonderful, loving husbands among men whose profiles did not fit their original conceptions but who had qualities that were far more compelling than ideal height, weight, jobs, interests, or age group.

Greenwald also advises women to take a good hard look at themselves, and to find out how others view them. The old "this is me, take it or leave it" attitude does not bode well in the search for a mate, she says. So in Step 3, Packaging, she explains why it is important to look your best at all times, and to do what it takes to present your most appealing self.

And throughout, Greenwald's advice is to network, network, network. Friends, relatives, old boyfriends, other women, high-school chums, neighbors, colleagues, travel agents, the Internet, dating services - any one of them might be the key to finding Mr. She also encourages women to put themselves out there - absolutely everywhere. As Greenwald says, the man of your dreams is somewhere, but the one place he is not is in your home, so go out the door and find him, because he is looking for you.

Anywhere can be an opportunity: a lecture, the grocery store, a different coffee shop than the one you frequent all the time, a class or seminar. And, she stresses, don't just go to places that interest you, but go where the men are: sports events, car shows, lectures on topics outside your sphere of knowledge.

An innovative idea Greenwald suggests is to devise and teach a course in your community that would appeal to single men, such as simple meals for bachelors or a conversation course for shy men.

Talk about a captive audience of single men, all focused on you! In one of the final chapters - dealing with questions and answers - Greenwald lists what not to say to a man on the first date.

She advises women not to say they are looking for a commitment - even though that's exactly what they're looking for. You don't want to scare the guy away on the first date. Four other first-date no-nos are: Don't ask about his income; don't be a complainer; don't talk about your ex-husband; and don't bring up your health issues.

These are all turnoffs, she says. From start to finish, Find a Husband after 35 is an intelligent, well-written how-to book.

Although the work may be arduous, the results are well worth it, asserts the author. It takes real commitment to undertake and accomplish all 15 steps. But, says this marriage maven, even if you complete only some of them, you are already ahead of the game. As the author says of one of the activities in Step 9, Niche Marketing, "If you're thinking, 'It's too embarrassing to ask six women to fix me up,' then go back to Step 1, Marketing Focus, and ask yourself if you're truly committed to finding a husband.

Nothing of value is easy, so you can either take the plunge and ask away, or go back to your therapist or sympathetic old friends - who, by the way, are sick of hearing you whine! Am I mean because I don't empathize with how difficult this may be for you? I do empathize. I really do. But I have to tell you: 'Just do it!

Part I. I'm refreshingly approachable! I'm a two-in-one shampoo! Marry me! In which the hapless author slavishly obeys a new bestseller that instructs husband-hunting women over 35 to market themselves like a brand. Editor's note: This is part of our series on marriage. By Cole Kazdin. She's the kind of woman I never thought would date me, but was, in fact, waiting patiently for me to ask her out the whole time.

My creative team has been working overtime on my ad campaign. After I conduct extensive focus-group testing, my pal Todd Levin, ad writer extraordinaire, turns my pages of research into a catchy paragraph and some suggested tag lines. What your friends want for you. I'm hot. I decide to go with "refreshingly approachable" because it's nonthreatening and brings to mind a glass of nice, cold soda. And everybody loves soda. Steps include packaging, branding, telemarketing and quarterly performance reviews, and I have agreed to give it a whirl.

In the spirit of full disclosure, I am close to but not yet 35, and I'm not looking for a husband. I have a wonderful boyfriend who is good-natured and supportive, especially when I come home and announce I am writing an article for which I have to go through 15 steps toward finding a husband.

The book itself is a little frightening in its directness. And that's just the cover. I look over my shoulder self-consciously in the bookstore as I pick up the book with "husband" in the title and a gold wedding band on the jacket.

I realize I must be in the "women's insecurity" section. I look up at the sign overhead and discover I am not in the women's-insecurity section at all, but rather the "bestsellers.

I get both books anyway. This is too embarrassing. I learn in Chapter 1 of Greenwald's book, however, that this is entirely the wrong approach. The idea of her "Program," as she calls it, is to let as many people as you can find know that you're single and looking for a husband. I decide to condense Greenwald's months into a two-week crash course. No bread, pasta, potatoes, rice, fruit or alcohol. Skinny jeans and life partner, here I come!

The first step is to make finding a husband my first priority. I want so much to do this in earnest, but it's difficult to keep a straight face. I can go so far as to make the experiment itself a priority for a couple of weeks and try -- really try -- to suspend my disbelief. Greenwald says that if you're serious about finding a husband, you must also create a budget and separate checking account devoted to your quest -- this money is for personal care, thank-you notes to people who set you up on dates, and the welding class at Home Depot you take to meet men more on that later.

That's all I can afford right now. Today is the first day of my new life and I don't miss bread and pasta one bit. The following day I find a mentor. According to the program, your mentor should be a woman, preferably married, who will guide you and support you on your journey.

You sign a written agreement with your mentor to contractually commit to meeting on a regular basis and working toward the common goal of finding you a husband.

Find a Husband After 35: (Using What I Learned at Harvard Business School)

Issue of Posted Objective measures of eligibility—appearance, earning power, age—are understood to determine whether individuals will be perceived as desirable commodities the six-foot-two investment banker; the communications director with a good decade of childbearing years still ahead of her or relegated to the remainder bin, shopworn by blind dates and disappointments. Class of , writes. Greenwald urges women to embrace the business practices they know from the workplace and apply them to private life.

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FIND A HUSBAND AFTER 35: Using What I Learned at Harvard Business School

Look Inside. Fate is late! The rules for finding the right mate change later in life, as there are fewer eligible men and fewer opportunities to meet them. Now successful dating coach Rachel Greenwald shares her proven step action program based on simple marketing tactics she learned at Harvard Business School. These innovative and smart tactics will empower any woman to find a husband quickly and efficiently—and not just any husband: a wonderful husband. In this practical no-nonsense guide, Greenwald tells women how to package their assets, develop a personal brand , leverage niche marketing , use direct mail and telemarketing to get the word out, establish a husband-hunting budget , and hold quarterly performance reviews to assess the results. She also shows women how to use these strategies in the world of online dating and how to avoid common pitfalls. She lives in Denver, Colorado, with her husband and three children. Read this book!

Find a Husband After 35

Rachel Greenwald. Fate is late! The rules for finding the right mate change later in life, as there are fewer eligible men and fewer opportunities to meet them. Now successful dating coach Rachel Greenwald shares her proven step action program based on simple marketing tactics she learned at Harvard Business School.

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Fate is late! For women 35 to 95, it's time to get proactive if you want to find a husband. The rules for finding the right mate change later in life, as there are fewer.

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Comments: 2
  1. Feramar

    Completely I share your opinion. In it something is also to me it seems it is excellent idea. I agree with you.

  2. Douhn

    Bravo, excellent idea

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