Site Logo
Looking for girlfriend > Blacks > When a woman stops getting her period

When a woman stops getting her period

Site Logo

That time of the month again? Periods are a part of life for many years for most women. They can, unfortunately, have a negative impact on your quality of life with cramps, bloating, breast tenderness, mood changes and irregular bleeding. During your lifetime, your menstrual cycle and periods change and evolve due to normal age-related hormonal changes and other factors such as stress, lifestyle, medications and certain medical conditions. But what is normal and what should you be concerned about? If a young girl has not had her first period by age 15 or within three years of breast development, she should be evaluated by a physician.

SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: Period pain - What’s the BEST WAY to stop it? - Dr. Claudia

Content:
SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: At what age does menstruation stop?

Menopause - signs, symptoms, treatment

Site Logo

That time of the month again? Periods are a part of life for many years for most women. They can, unfortunately, have a negative impact on your quality of life with cramps, bloating, breast tenderness, mood changes and irregular bleeding. During your lifetime, your menstrual cycle and periods change and evolve due to normal age-related hormonal changes and other factors such as stress, lifestyle, medications and certain medical conditions. But what is normal and what should you be concerned about?

If a young girl has not had her first period by age 15 or within three years of breast development, she should be evaluated by a physician. Menstruation may be irregular at first, with as many as 6 months passing between periods.

Most cycles are in the range of days, although shorter or longer cycles may occur. By the third year, most menstrual cycles are that of a typical adult woman: days long 28 days on average , and each period lasting for days. Once you enter your 20s, your period will likely become more consistent as you begin to ovulate more regularly. You may start to experience more symptoms, like PMS, cramps and breast tenderness.

This is also the time that many women decide to begin birth control pills or other forms of contraception. Contraception may change your periods by making them shorter, lighter and more regular with less bleeding, cramping, and reduced PMS symptoms.

Different contraception options will impact your menstrual cycle and period differently. Your physician should discuss these different changes with you when deciding on a contraception option. In addition, you should be aware of the menstrual side effects that each form of contraception may have. Your menstrual cycle should be pretty predictable and consistent in this decade. Some benign conditions can appear in your 30s, including fibroids and polyps of the endometrium or cervix.

Sometimes, these conditions can make your period heavier and cause painful cramps or you may experience intermenstrual bleeding.

During your reproductive lifetime teens through 40s your cycle can also change after you have a baby. Some women experience heavier, longer or more painful periods, and for others, their periods improve after having a baby.

Beginning in your 40s, the amount of estrogen produced by the ovaries may begin to fluctuate and you may not ovulate as regularly. These are the years leading up to menopause , called perimenopause. Perimenopause can last from a few months to more than 10 years prior to your last menstrual period.

The most common symptom of perimenopause is a change in your menstrual cycle. You may have periods that are longer, shorter, heavier or lighter than usual, or you may begin to skip periods. You may also experience hot flashes, sleep issues, vaginal dryness, urinary issues and emotional changes. Most women will experience menopause in their 50s.

The average age of menopause is 51 and a normal range is between ages A good indicator of when you may begin menopause is when your mother did. Other factors that can impact age of menopause include the number of babies you have women with more babies tend to have later menopause , tobacco users may have menopause earlier and ethnicity can impact age of menopause.

African American and Hispanic women tend to have earlier menopause than Caucasian women. If you experience bleeding after menopause, let your doctor know right away. It could be a sign of something serious like uterine cancer. Although your menstrual cycle can change over time, alert you doctor if you notice any of these potentially serious symptoms :. Your menstrual cycle can tell you a lot about your overall health. If at any time you experience any unusual symptoms or sudden changes to your cycle, let your doctor know.

Jeffrey Fitzer, M. Read his profile and schedule an appointment online. Hot flashes anyone? Answers to your questions about menopause. Read More. If you have reached this screen, your current device or browser is unable to access the full Edward-Elmhurst Health Web site. To see the full site, please upgrade your browser to the most recent version of Safari, Chrome, Firefox or Internet Explorer. If you cannot upgrade your browser, you can remain on this site.

Back to Healthy Driven Blog Home. View All Healthy Driven Blogs. How your period changes through the years August 02, by Jeffrey Fitzer, M. Categories: Healthy Driven Moms. Leave a Comment. Edward-Elmhurst Health i

The menopause: how will your periods come to an end?

Author: Victoria Slater. A disappearing period may seem ideal for many women, but if it stops suddenly or unexpectedly, there may be cause for concern. Secondary amenorrhea, or the absence of menstruation for three months or more in a patient who previously had normal cycles, affects up to 5 percent of menstruating women every year. While pregnancy is the most common cause, Geri Hewitt, MD , Ob-Gyn at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, says that a variety of factors can cause a period to disappear, and many can be — and should be — evaluated and possibly require treated by a medical professional.

Amenorrhea—the absence of menstrual periods—does not always signify a serious problem. It may be caused by natural hormonal changes such as menopause or something as common as stress.

Amenorrhea means an absence of menstruation. The term also applies to people who have not started their period by the age of 16, which is called primary amenorrhea. Secondary amenorrhea occurs in people who have missed 3 months of periods. This article explores possible reasons for an absence of menstruation. It also covers when to see a doctor and the treatment options.

Absence of Menstrual Periods

For many women, periods are just a monthly nuisance. But for some of us, periods are painful and disabling, causing us to miss out on school and work and life. For the majority of my teenage years, my monthly period triggered a migraine and cramps so severe I might throw up or even blackout. I spent a lot of time lying in bed with a heating pad and popping prescription ibuprofen. I was in my early 20s before a doctor finally told me that I could stop my period altogether. My quality of life improved within two months. Women suppress their periods for a variety of reasons. Athletes use the method to avoid the hassle of periods and cramps during important competitions. Researchers are also studying how fewer periods can help improve quality of life for women in extreme employment situations. The researchers found that interest in continuous contraception among deployed women was high — 66 percent wanted to try it out.

At what age does menstruation stop?

Amenorrhea pronounced "a-men-or-RE-ah" means simply the absence of menstrual periods. There are two types of amenorrhea — primary and secondary:. Without enough estrogen, not only do menstrual cycles stop, but also the body is prevented from being able to absorb calcium to build strong bones. This can result in low bone mass.

Amenorrhea uh-men-o-REE-uh is the absence of menstruation — one or more missed menstrual periods.

All A-Z health topics. View all pages in this section. The javascript used in this widget is not supported by your browser.

What causes an absence of menstruation?

What happens to your menstrual cycle in the lead up to the menopause? I explain all and how home, herbal and conventional remedies could help. Although reaching the menopause technically means you have had your last ever period, we often use this phrase to describe the lead up to your periods stopping.

The purpose of the Southern Cross Medical Library is to provide information of a general nature to help you better understand certain medical conditions. Always seek specific medical advice for treatment appropriate to you. This information is not intended to relate specifically to insurance or healthcare services provided by Southern Cross. Medical Library Topics. The term menopause is commonly used to describe the years when a woman's ovaries gradually begin to produce fewer eggs and less of the female hormones oestrogen and progesterone. This reduction in hormone production causes periods to become less regular until they stop altogether, and produces physical and psychological symptoms in many women.

Healthy Driven Blogs

While the average age of menopause is 51, there's a year range in which you might start to feel symptoms. Certain factors can affect when this change of life will happen to you. There is no set age at which all women will start to go through menopause. The average age of menopause in the United States is 51, but it is considered perfectly normal for a woman to go through it at any time between the ages of 35 and 59, says Lila Schmidt, MD, a reproductive endocrinologist in private practice in San Diego. It is not known why some women get signs of menopause in their mid to late thirties or early forties.

Jul 25, - Women who have missed at least three menstrual periods in a row have stop having periods because of these abnormal hormonal changes.

The stopping of menstruation is called menopause. The average age for menopause is 51 years old, but some women will have it a year or two earlier, and some will have it a year or two later. Prior to that, women experience something called perimenopause, which are the years leading up to menopause. Some present with skipped periods or a change in flow—either lighter or heavier.

Menopause, Perimenopause and Postmenopause

Amenorrhea may be accompanied by other symptoms, depending on the cause. For example, women may develop masculine characteristics virilization , such as excess body hair hirsutism , a deepened voice, and increased muscle size. They may have headaches, vision problems, or a decreased sex drive.

Menopause is a stage in life when you stop having your monthly period. Menopause typically occurs in your late 40s to early 50s. However, women who have their ovaries surgically removed undergo "sudden" surgical menopause. Natural menopause — menopause that happens in your early 50s and is not caused by surgery or another medical condition — is a normal part of aging.

Learn more.

.

.

.

Comments: 3
  1. Samugis

    In my opinion you are mistaken. I can prove it. Write to me in PM.

  2. Kigat

    I think, that you are mistaken. I can defend the position.

  3. Melkree

    In it something is also to me it seems it is excellent idea. Completely with you I will agree.

Thanks! Your comment will appear after verification.
Add a comment

© 2020 Online - Advisor on specific issues.