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What do you think when you look at me by dalia mogahed

Positive Psychotherapy : Clinician Manual. Tayyab Rashid , Martin P. For over a century the focus of psychotherapy has been on what ails us, with the therapeutic process resting upon the assumption that unearthing past traumas, correcting faulty thinking, and restoring dysfunctional relationships is curative. And indeed, they are - but in the rush to identify and reduce symptoms of mental disorder, something important has been overlooked: the positives. Should enhancing well-being, and building upon character strengths and virtues, be explicit goals of therapy?

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Dalia Mogahed

Published for OnFaith. Co formerly Washington Post. Sahil: In the past decade, especially Muslims have engaged in outreach initiatives to help correct the perception of Islam in the West and the world generally. You, for example, co-authored the book Who Speaks For Islam?

This was based on six years of research and more than 50, interviews. What factors might be overwhelming or negating progress to change this perception? Dalia: Thank you for the question. The first being that there is a well-funded, well-organized industry that has no other goal than to manufacture fear against Islam and Muslims. We are out-funded and outorganized by hate.

You look at that budget and you compare it to the budget of groups that are working for tolerance, or groups that are working for better understanding or education, the numbers are so much bigger on the side of organized hate. Groups that work for factual, accurate understanding are just not as lucrative. A second factor is media bias. Media bias is real. The thing is about the Islamophobic industry is it feeds into mainstream media so mainstream media is heavily impacted by the Islamophobic industry.

Then, there is, of course, political rhetoric. We know that around election years, Anti-Muslim sentiments spikes. The perceived connection between Islam and violence spikes in the American public even when there is no new violent acts. In fact, violent acts, real violent acts, do less to spike them, perception that Islam and violence are connected than they do less to grow that perception than does a presidential campaign.

Sahil: How do we change perceptions perhaps more quickly? Would it be through popular culture, stories, movies, TV, etc? What other areas would you, personally, like to see more Muslim presence? Dalia: I definitely think popular culture is very important. I also think that just public education is extremely important. Aside from all of that, we actually have to find a way to call out, expose, and make clear that the Islamophobic industry is a harm to every American. Unless we cut off the poison, the body is never going to be healthy no matter how many vitamins we give it.

Islamophobia is a cancer. It is a harm to and a danger to every American not just Muslims. There has to be a greater effort in challenging, calling out, and stopping the-churning out of hate-filled material.

If you look at our society, there are certain things that we no longer say and do. There are certain words we no longer use to describe groups of people. There are certain cartoons that are no longer acceptable in our society even though they were, say, 80 years ago. We should not tolerate that kind of racism. It is time for us to recognize as a society that Islamophobia is actually harming our democracy, and because of that we have to say no to it as a society and evolve beyond it.

We are a vital organ. Dalia: I think the stories that need to be told are of one of humanity. A lot of us are tired of giving white America the ability to certify our humanity by appealing to them for that certification.

Muslims are human beings. The stories I think we need to tell are ones of complexity, humanity, not perfect people. I say that with love. I say that with compassion for the public that has been misinformed.

We cannot cuddle racism. We cannot accommodate it by continuing to appeal to it, to certify our humanity. I think that stopping short of calling it out, pointing it out, making people aware of their unintentional bias will never get us to where we need to be. The time for all of that is completely over. They become more accepting of authoritarianism, conformity and prejudice. Are there any other potential solutions you might provide to Muslims, or other relevant organizations and groups to be more effective in changing perceptions or to rethink their strategy?

Dalia: There is a number of things that have been shown to be effective. I think that just meeting people where they are, and then gently guiding them to a different place is one narrative that, I think, we need to incorporate a lot more.

Another really important strategy is coalition building. The more that people can work across color and creed for a common goal of a more just society, the more likely they are to succeed. The third is, I think we have to do a lot better job of holding media accountable.

The media is supposed to inform the public. When it stops doing that, when it starts to do the opposite by disinforming people, we owe it to our democracy to make a correction to that. Before they can do that, they have to educate themselves on what that bias looks like and how to spot it.

Sahil: Quoting another study you use which shows that when subjects were exposed to new stories that were negative about Muslims, they became more accepting of military attacks on Muslim countries and policies that curtail the rights of Muslims such as American Muslims. The media, as you said, often focuses on sensational, violent and negative stories of which the Muslim world has managed to offer over the past few decades. This, unfortunately, dominates the news to the exclusion of many positive stories, which are not reported, leading to clearly skewed perceptions of the Muslim world.

What else can be done to address this bias? Dalia: I think a couple of things. First, communities have to learn more about how the media works and learn how to pitch positive stories, develop relationships with editors and reporters so that those stories are heard and increase the chances of them being reported on.

There is responsibility on media outlets to look for those stories, to listen when those stories are brought to them and to actually report on them. I have seen situations where communities do everything I just said. There is beautiful visuals that are possible, and yet they are still ignored by even their local media.

Sahil: Given your extensive work with polling, I wanted to take this opportunity to help our audience understand polling better, as numbers are throwing out all the time. Given this contradiction which really shows, I would say, the lived experience of religious people, what are common mistakes or misunderstandings people often have when they read or cite polls?

The way you know a sample is representative is not by how large the sample size is. This is a very popular misconception. Representation actually has very little to do with how large a sample is.

It has to do with the quality of the sample and how it was selected. Representation, actually has very little to do with how large a sample is.

A representative sample is one where every citizen in the country has a chance, and an equal chance, to have been selected for the survey. Not everyone saw your ad. Not everyone has Facebook. Not everyone has internet. Not everyone has electricity. What Pew does and what Gallup does, the company I used to work for, and what a good polling firm will do, is they will use methods that select households for interviews at random, therefore, everyone has an equal chance of being selected so 1, people are more representative than 80, done on Facebook.

Now, in the case of this question which gets brought up quite a bit, especially by liberal Islamophobes. The question, I believe, was one of asking people a theological question and then being interpreted in a very political way. Now, is this actually ever implemented? Is that the law in Egypt?

Do people actually get executed for leaving a faith? They actually do not. This is also not something that happens to people even in cases of vigilante violence against people. It is a very theoretical response based on how people have been educated according to a certain medieval, pre-modern interpretation.

I will add that that interpretation is usually understood in a pre-modern context where leaving the faith actually is assumed to mean an act of treason, is joining an enemy force to fight against your previous community.

I think this is a reflection of how Egyptians are educated on this question rather than something that was deeply thought about and is being acted on in any way, shape, or form.

Now, as someone who holds a different point of view in my own religious understanding, I would love to change the way Egyptians are educated about this. Demonizing and dehumanizing these communities by putting out these poll findings so out of context does absolutely nothing to improve the situation and does absolutely nothing to even empower the folks on the ground trying to make change indigenously.

Sahil: On a different note, what impact, from your experience, have polls and other data metrics been in changing perceptions and attitudes. I absolutely think relationships and personal interactions are very —. Dalia: Thank the Lord polls do actually also help to change perceptions.

Dalia: I certainly hope not. After reading this article that contained this data, people had a more humanized view of Muslims. So no, data actually can work. Relationships are incredibly important as well. Sahil: Any final thoughts or advise you want to give or you want to provide for better understanding and utilizing poll data?

Dalia: I think that poll data always has to be contextualized. I think that these numbers that you cite about Egyptian culture are perfect example that where someone throws these around as proof of Muslim barbarism without really understanding the full history and the full background.

I think that poll data always has to be contextualized.

Dalia Mogahed :What Do You think When You look at Me?

With Rising Islamophobia,Muslims are branded as a terrorist. Intolerance is spreading its wing at a rapid pace. Religion is simply a matter of faith. Branding all the People of a particular faith without Knowing anything about its correct teaching and its Scripture is a matter of Prejudice.

One motivation for building inclusive work cultures, research shows, is the increase in fresh thinking, ideas and innovation that come from different mindsets working together. Another is the opportunity to create a workplace environment that is welcoming, encouraging, and respectful of differences in ideology and backgrounds.

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What do you think when you look at me? | Dalia Mogahed

Published for OnFaith. Co formerly Washington Post. Sahil: In the past decade, especially Muslims have engaged in outreach initiatives to help correct the perception of Islam in the West and the world generally. You, for example, co-authored the book Who Speaks For Islam? This was based on six years of research and more than 50, interviews. What factors might be overwhelming or negating progress to change this perception? Dalia: Thank you for the question. The first being that there is a well-funded, well-organized industry that has no other goal than to manufacture fear against Islam and Muslims. We are out-funded and outorganized by hate.

What do you think when you look at me?

Learn more about its impacts on our operations. Then, in , she decided to leave the company and pursue an MBA in Pittsburgh. Her plans changed on the day she intended to hit the road and make the move. That day was September 11,

Some people want to ban Muslims and close down mosques.

What is our role as business leaders in creating peace, bringing diverse populations together, and addressing exclusion, particularly religious exclusion? Corporate society increasingly has an opportunity and some believe a responsibility to impact how we as a culture look at diversity, difference, and inclusion. As a business leader, I think every day about my role in making a difference, creating lasting impact, and what factors in my environment will ultimately contribute to our success.

Dalia Mogahed On ‘What it’s like to be Muslim in America’

Updated: Apr 8. This piece was originally published in Girls Globe. Dalia Mogahed is one of my idols. She is a covered Muslim woman who works in public policy.

SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: What does my headscarf mean to you? - Yassmin Abdel-Magied

What a Billion Muslims Really Think. Q1: In an article that you wrote, you argued that negative sentiments about Muslims and Islam in the United States follow domestic politics as opposed to international politics or acts of terrorism. Could you talk more about that? That was always the diagnosis of the problem, and I believed that as well, but one time I noticed something strange. This is very weird, and hard to explain, and yet there it was. So, I looked into it more and realized that the spike was around the time of the presidential campaign.

What do you think when you look at me? Dalia Mogahed

Muna Ali. Young Muslim America explores the perspectives and identities of the American descendants of immigrant Muslims and converts to Islam. Whether their parents were new Muslims or new Americans, the younger generations of Muslim Americans grow up bearing a dual heritage and are uniquely positioned to expound the meaning of both. In this ethnographic study, Muna Ali explores the role of young Muslim Americans within America and the ummah through four dominant narratives that emerge from discussions about and among Muslims. Cultural differences purportedly cause an identity crisis among young Muslims torn between seemingly irreconcilable Islamic and Western heritages.

When you look at Muslim scholar Dalia Mogahed, what do you see: A woman of faith? In this personal Feb 15,

Skip navigation! Story from World News. Sometimes, we show prejudice without even realizing we're doing so. Mogahed, director of research at the Institute for Social Policy and Understanding, hopes to fight common misunderstandings about Muslims and how they are portrayed by American media outlets. She explained that many Americans have never met a Muslim person, so their opinions on the religion may be formed by what they see in the news, which is often negative.

Q&A with Dalia Mogahed

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Comments: 1
  1. Vudozahn

    What nice phrase

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