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Little boy blue and girl in pink

JavaScript seems to be disabled in your browser. You must have JavaScript enabled in your browser to utilize the functionality of this website. All of us who have children have been asked time and again when we were pregnant if it would be a boy or a girl. Some of us chose to know in advance, and some of us prefered to wait and be surprised. We have of course done it as well, and asked expectant parents the same question, not only out of curiosity but also to be able to buy the appropriate card or gift for the new baby. But we would most probably not get anything pink unless we knew for sure we were buying for a girl.

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SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: Why was Pink for Boys and Blue for Girls?

Why Is Pink for Girls and Blue for Boys?

I have a hard time remembering faces. Person in the red shirt, person with the blue hat. We have a societal expectation that babies will reliably be identifiable by color. Blue quickly becomes less important for boys, but pink is for girls is perpetuated throughout childhood and beyond. As a child, it was just a fact.

Gendered colors are just the way things are, and we might expect that it has always been this way. That seems pretty definitive, right? Everything the boy wears is blue and everything girl wears is pink. If we take these two paintings in isolation, we could conclude that our modern gendered color scheme has been around since at least the mid-eighteenth century and probably earlier.

Of course, that would be very poor historical research and fails to explain other paintings, such as this anonymous work:. This painting of a young child in a pink and white dress with a lacy collar is entitled Young Boy with Whip. This is not an isolated depiction. Thomas Gainsborough. The reality we see from this period is not one of gendered colors. It is just colors, some of which happen to be blue and pink.

Young children in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries were not dressed like their modern counterparts. Parents did not color code wardrobes or nursery designs. The entire look of young children at the time tended to be fairly gender neutral since they were usually dressed in white linen or cotton dresses.

The age for this practice shifted over time, and later there was an intermediary period of short pants for a time before being moved on to longer trousers. Mention is made of the color association as early as the first half of the nineteenth century. There are references throughout nineteenth century European and American publications about pink for girls and blue for boys, but this was far from the excessive and exclusive use of the colors today. We also find references throughout the same period in the same regions to the opposite practice; pink for boys and blue for girls.

The disagreement lasted for a long time. The reason is that pink, being a more decided and stronger color, is more suitable for the boy, while blue, which is more delicate and dainty, is prettier for the girl.

Both sides waxed and waned in popularity throughout the inter-war period until a major shift towards standardizing pink for girls and blue for boys in the s. Producing and selling standardized gendered colors was easier and more profitable so they chose a scheme and stuck with it. Advertisements and store display can have an enormous impact on public opinion, and, to some degree, the colors have been set ever since.

This took off with reliable prenatal gender identification. Suddenly, ads and products were everywhere to outfit a nursery in the appropriate color before the baby arrived. There was pressure on TV, in print ads, and in stores to put your baby in the specified color.

Friends, relatives, and even strangers expected that you would follow the prevailing cultural paradigm and color code your baby. It was a victory for manufacturers and stores that found they could sell two sets of identical equipment and clothing to parents that had a second child of the opposite gender. The idea that the colors are somehow innately pleasing to children has been shown to be false.

Then, by two and a half, girls show a preference for pink while boys actively avoid it. Consider the likely reactions of people to a little girl dressed in blue and playing with Matchbox cars compared to a little boy dressed in bright pink and playing with a baby doll. The color preference for girls does not last. By adulthood, many women actively dislike the color pink, at least the shades most associated with girlhood, likely because of being forced to prefer it as a child.

Data suggests that ad campaigns using pink as their primary color scheme do poorer with women despite them being the primary target. Seeing that what has been considered such a foundational marker of gender is an artificial and relatively recent marketing creation should cause us to question received norms in the topic and approach it with openness and a critical eye.

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Pink=Girl Blue=Boy: The Relatively Recent History of Gendered Baby Colors

Five week old twins newborn wearing pink and blue — boy or girl? To understand this concept, we have to go back to a time before colors were associated with gender at all. As revealed by Jo B. Paoletti, a professor at the University of Maryland and author of Pink and Blue: Telling the Boys from the Girls in America , there was once a time well before pink and blue were used to distinguish between boys and girls at all. Portrait of a young girl in pink dress by Raimundo de Madrazo y Garreta, s.

Blue is for boys and pink is for girls, we're told. But do these gender norms reflect some inherent biological difference between the sexes, or are they culturally constructed? It depends on whom you ask.

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List of historical sources for pink and blue as gender signifiers

Future President Franklin D. Roosevelt in If we were to play a word association game where I said a word and you had to yell out the first color that came to mind, it would probably go something like this: Banana- Yellow; Apple- Red; Boy- Blue; Girl- Pink. We can all understand why yellow and red are associated with bananas and apples, but boys are not blue and girls are not pink. So why are these colors so very much associated with these genders? Gender identification by color began in the early 20th century in the Western world. Before this, pink and blue did not hold any gender specific connotations and there are numerous examples of men wearing pink outfits and girls wearing blue; one French author, Xavier de Maistre in his work, A Journey Around My Room published in , even recommended that men choose to paint their rooms pink and white to improve the mood. Fast-forward to the early 20th century and this began to change. The generally accepted rule is pink for the boys, and blue for the girls. The reason is that pink , being a more decided and stronger color, is more suitable for the boy, while blue, which is more delicate and dainty, is prettier for the girl.

Here’s Why it All Changed: Pink Used to be a Boy’s Color & Blue For Girls

Cabinet of Curiosities is a series meant to explain some of the most prevailing mysteries out there. A lot of these "curiosities" involve seriously confusing scientific studies, so we're trying to break it down into layman's terms. Because nobody has time to decipher an entire science experiment when looking for a quick explanation online. Walk into a Babies"R"Us and you might as well walk into two stores sharing the same retail space.

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To avoid that awkward moment, we often look for the universal clue — a splattering of pink for a girl, or blue for a boy. Back then, pink was a particularly treasured dye and pink cloth was often used as the first prize in horse races. And because it was expensive, pink was used by the male elite.

Pretty in pink and little boy blue

Earlier, we discussed the theory that the "pink is for girls, blue is for boys" binary is foisted on children by society. In baby photos from the late s, male and female tots wear frilly white dresses — so how did pink onesies with "Princess" emblazoned on the butt infiltrate American girls' wardrobes? According to Smithsonian. For centuries, all children had worn practical white dresses, which could easily be pulled up to change diapers, and bleached when said diapers inevitably exploded.

Since the 19th century, the colors pink and blue have been used as gender signifiers, particularly for infants and young children. The current tradition in the United States and an unknown number of other countries is "pink for girls, blue for boys". Prior to , two conflicting traditions coexisted in the U. This was noted by Paoletti , [2] , [3] [1]. Since the s, Paoletti's research has been misinterpreted and has evolved into an urban legend: that there was a full reversal in , prior to which the only tradition observed was the opposite of the current one. Ladies Childbirth, she said, is announced in this manner, and when the pincushion is pink background, this is a sign of the coming into this world a little girl, while the blue background pelotte announces that it is a boy.

When Did Girls Start Wearing Pink?

From novelist Quinn High Strung, , an oddly flat first collection that deals mostly with overly familiar domestic issues. In "Dough," a young woman with a "peaceful father" and a mother who went Read full review. Account Options Sign in. My library Help Advanced Book Search. Bulletproof Girl : Stories. Quinn Dalton.

Apr 7, - Why have young children's clothing styles changed so dramatically? How did we end up with two “teams”—boys in blue and girls in pink?

Pinkie is the traditional title for a portrait made in by Thomas Lawrence in the permanent collection of the Huntington Library at San Marino, California where it hangs opposite The Blue Boy by Thomas Gainsborough. These two works are the centerpieces of the institute's art collection, which specialises in eighteenth-century English portraiture. The painting is an elegant depiction of Sarah Moulton , who was about eleven years old when painted. Her direct gaze and the loose, energetic brushwork give the portrait a lively immediacy.

Why boys are blue and girls are pink

I have a hard time remembering faces. Person in the red shirt, person with the blue hat. We have a societal expectation that babies will reliably be identifiable by color. Blue quickly becomes less important for boys, but pink is for girls is perpetuated throughout childhood and beyond.

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Comments: 3
  1. Mam

    Yes, happens...

  2. Moogurg

    What words... super, a magnificent idea

  3. Mausar

    I do not doubt it.

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